Beginner’s Mind – Foundation of Mindfulness # 3

In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.

Shunryo Suzuki

Past experiences and preconceived ideas have great value when it comes to making decisions about everyday activities. However, they are tainted to a degree that we are not able to absorb the new reality of the present time or the face value of an action, a discussion or a situation. It is always comfortable to skim through the information to support and validate our previous experience, nevertheless, we tend to lose the possibility of learning a new way of doing things or transforming our ideas for better by seeing things with fresh eyes.

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Art by Magritte – The Human Condition

Everybody knows that some things are simply impossible until somebody who doesn’t know that makes them possible. - Albert Einstein

The real problem starts when you are an expert, one who has more assumptions than questions. Fending off new ways of doing things or not being receptive to new ideas happens to the experienced. An apprehension swishes and contaminates the mind which in turn will end up either with cherry-picking to justify the established rules and practices or simply dismissal of the new approach.

When we adopt the mind of a beginner, we endeavour to look at things as if for the first time, free from the influence of the past or speculation about the future. We open ourselves to what is here now, rather than constructing stories about what we think is here. Much like a scientist who observes without bias, beginner’s mind allows us to collect raw data. This opens us up to new possibilities, rather than being confined by habits and conditioning. — Tracy Ochester.

 

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Art by Magritte – The treachery of images

 

A beginner’s mind is keen to meet a new person, to have a fresh outlook on people that are familiar or to learn a new skill. Practising beginners’ mind, (or shoshin in Japanese Zen Buddhism) feeds a growth mindset. One that refuses to have more of the same for the rest of its life since the safety zone is not always a good place to be. It stales the mind and prevents you to grow and reach your potential. Although by default, we prefer to stay in our comfort zone yet adopting a growth mindset requires courage to embrace vulnerability and humility. To acknowledge that there is always a better way of doing things or when it comes to human relations, we give people the benefit of the doubt.

Ways to cultivate a beginner’s mind

  • Adopt the notion that endless possibilities exist
  • Switch off the autopilot mode 
  • Be in the present moment
  • Listen carefully when a familiar topic comes up, you don’t have to rush to express your opinion or add value, just observe and ask questions as if you didn’t know about the subject
  • Explore something to re-experience the feelings, it can be basic as eating your meal or making your bed
  • Stop labelling and notice that you are on auto judgement – Ask yourself why you consider things as bad, good, right or wrong?  Is it out of habit? Integrate seeing things in your life as they are!
  • Learn a new activity, to integrate challenges to your comfort zone
  • Mingle with people who have a different view of life and explore their perspective and lifestyle.
  • Change a routine in your life, whether is your walking route, exercise or things you eat. 
  • Practice gratitude and appreciation – it weakens the habit of taking things for granted

For more information, read “Full Catastrophe Living” by Jon Kabat-Zinn.

 

Featured Image by aykutaydogdu

 

 


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